Nature Ideas Series with Canadian Museum of Nature

Arctic Perspectives: Oceans of Change

Tuesday, June 7, 2022 

Presentation – 7:00 p.m. EST 

Q&A – 8:00 p.m. EST 

REGISTER HERE

  

The Arctic Ocean is keenly affected by the changing climate. Oceanic changes impact not only the biodiversity of oceanic species, but human life and transport over the land. 

Join Dr. Jackie Dawson, University of Ottawa, and Dr. Kirstin Holsman, NOAA co-authors of the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II Assessment Report, to learn why this report matters to each of us and how you can personally contribute to efforts to keep our oceans clean and healthy. 

This session helps celebrate Ocean Week Canada taking place from June 3 to 12, 2022.

Speaker Bios

Dr. Jackie Dawson is a Canada Research Chair Full Professor in the Department of Geography, Environment, and Geomatics at the University of Ottawa and is the Scientific Director of the Canadian Network of Centers of Excellence, ArcticNet. She is an applied scientist working on the human and policy dimensions of environmental change in ocean and coastal regions and is considered an expert in Arctic shipping, Arctic tourism, and Arctic oceans governance. She has served on two Canadian Council of Academies’ Expert Panels, is an elected member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada and is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographic Society. She led the drafting of the 2018 G7 science statement focused on Arctic oceans and resilient communities, is a lead author on the IPCC AR6 and recently won the prestigious 2020 SSHRC Impact Connection award and 2021 Governor Generals Innovation award. 

Dr. Kirstin Holsman is a Research Fishery Biologist with the Resource Ecology and Ecosystem Modeling team at the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle (USA). Her research is focused on the development of quantitative methods to support climate-ready Ecosystem Based Management for North Pacific and Arctic marine systems. Her work involves multidisciplinary collaborations aimed at providing information, advice, and tools to support effective adaptation responses to climate change and shocks. She is co-lead investigator of the Alaska Climate Integrated Modeling Project, co-chair of the North Pacific Marine Fisheries Council Climate Change Task Force, regional and national representative for the NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program and is a member of multiple national and international climate change strategic initiatives. She has also co-authored regional, national, and international climate change assessments including the IPCC WGII 6th Assessment Report and the 5th US National Climate Assessment. 

REGISTER HERE

NatureIDEAS: Arctic Perspectives

Join us live from the Canadian Museum of Nature for the next event in their virtual speaker’s series, NatureIDEAS: Arctic Perspectives. This year’s series examines Arctic research connections and international collaboration between Canada and the US:

Exploring the Life of a Wooly Mammoth

Wednesday May 11, 2022

Presentation – 7:00 p.m. EST

Q&A – 8:00 p.m. EST

Walk with an Ice Age Giant: Exploring the Life of a Woolly Mammoth and Why it Matters for the Arctic Today

Discover the life of a woolly mammoth! Dr. Matthew Wooller (University of Alaska Fairbanks) used isotope analysis in an unprecedented study to map the astonishing lifetime journey of a woolly mammoth in Alaska.
   
Dr. Danielle Fraser (Canadian Museum of Nature) studies ice age mammals. Dr. Fraser will speak to Ice Age mammals and the ongoing work of the Museum on Arctic sciences.
         
Dr. Wooller will share his insight on how the woolly mammoth lived and travelled during the last ice age and how understanding mammoth’s movements not only enables us to better understand one of the most popular animals of the ice age, but helps us see how our planet and ecosystems react in the face of environmental change.

Join us on May 11th for an enlightening and educational discussion for children and adults about the fascinating woolly mammoth.

Dr. Matthew Wooller Ph.D.

 

Dr. Matthew Wooller is a Professor and Director of Alaska Stable Isotope Facility at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where he has lived and worked happily for the last 20 years. Dr. Wooller is very grateful to the Alaskan Naive people and their ancestors, who have cared for and stewarded the land for over 10,000 years on which his house, office and laboratory reside. In his research he uses a wide range of isotopic techniques to study past and present organisms and ecosystems. Both of his graduate degrees are from the University of Wales in the UK, including a masters of science in Ecology and a PhD in Paleoecology. Dr. Wooller did a post doctorate fellowship with Dr. Marilyn Fogel at the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Geophysical Laboratory in Washington D.C. before moving to Alaska where he conducts research in Arctic ecology, paleoecology and environmental change. He is most passionate about paleoecology and one of his favorite organisms is mammoths, where he uses isotope analyses of their remains to reveal their ecology and movement in the wilds of ancient Alaska.  Dr. Wooller will talk about his group’s efforts using isotope analyses of mammoth tusks to better understand the movement ecology of mammoths leading up to their eventual extinction after the end of the last ice age. 

Danielle Fraser Ph.D. 

 

Danielle Fraser, Ph.D., is a paleobiologist, and director of The Beaty Centre for Species Discovery at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Danielle studies the palaeoecology and evolution of Cenozoic-Era (66 million years to present) mammals. She is a palaeoecologist and evolutionary biologist who is interested in how and why we have the mammals we do today and understanding how they might change under ongoing global change. She is particularly interested in the evolution of hoofed mammals (relatives of modern horses, pigs, sheep and deer), studying their diversification, morphological and dietary evolution during the Cenozoic of North America. 

NatureIDEAS is a national event series about Canada’s relationship with nature and its integral part in our future. NatureIDEAS has been made possible with the support of U.S. Mission to Canada Public Affairs Grant.

Register Here: https://form.jotform.com/221174479355259

Past Events

NatureIDEAS: Arctic Perspectives

Join us live from the Canadian Museum of Nature for the first event in their virtual speaker’s series, NatureIDEAS: Arctic Perspectives. This year’s series examines Arctic research connections and international collaboration between Canada and the US:

Cold-Loving Critters: Where Do Arctic Microbes Come From and What Do They Have to Do With Clouds?

Thursday March 24, 2022

Presentation – 7:00 p.m. EST

Q&A – 8:00 p.m. EST

Hear from Dr. Jessie Creamean, a research scientist from Colorado State University, who will discuss her theory about why microbes and Arctic cloud formations are contributing to climate change. She will also reflect on her recent participation with the MOSAiC Arctic expedition, including how she was able to conduct her research about the Polarstern while spending four months trapped in ice.

NatureIDEAS is a national event series about Canada’s relationship with nature and its integral part in our future. NatureIDEAS has been made possible with the support of U.S. Mission to Canada Public Affairs Grant.

Register Here: https://nature-ca.zoom.us/webinar/register/8216457258211/WN_nDnBvEviSu2XWQcnwEYRvA

IDÉESnature : Perspectives arctiques

Joignez-vous à nous en direct du Musée canadien de la nature pour le premier événement de la série de conférences virtuelles, IDÉESnature : Perspectives arctiques. La série de cette année examine la recherche dans l’Arctique et la collaboration internationale entre le Canada et les États-Unis :

Des microbes cryophiles : D’où viennent les microbes de l’Arctique et qu’ont-ils à faire avec les nuages?

jeudi le 24 mars 2022

Présentation – 1900 hrs EST

Questions et réponses – 2000 hrs EST

Jessie Creamean, chercheuse scientifique en chimie atmosphérique à l’Université d’État du Colorado, partagera sa théorie sur la façon dont les microbes et la formation de nuages arctiques contribuent au changement climatique. Dans la foulée de sa récente participation à l’expédition dans l’Arctique, Mme Creamean parlera également de son expérience à bord du Polarstern alors qu’elle était piégée dans la glace. Dans le cadre de ses recherches, elle a passé quatre mois à recueillir des échantillons d’aérosol, d’eau de mer et de glace de mer.

À propos d’IDÉESnature est une série d’événements nationaux sur la relation du Canada avec la nature et son rôle essentiel dans notre avenir. IDÉESnature est rendu possible grâce à la générosité du Programme de subventions aux missions d’affaires publiques des États-Unis au Canada.

Inscrivez vous ici 

https://nature-ca.zoom.us/webinar/register/8216457258211/WN_nDnBvEviSu2XWQcnwEYRvA

Nature Ideas: Climate change and mammal

extinction in the age of humans

Featuring Danielle Fraser, Ph.D., Director, The Beaty Centre for Species Discovery, Canadian Museum of Nature & Advait Jukar, Ph.D., Yale University

April 21st @ 7:00pm eastern

Is climate changing faster now than ever before? We know that, today, animal populations are declining and many species are at risk of extinction. How do rates of extinction compare between today and in the past? Are humans responsible? Join paleontologists Advait Jukar and Dani Fraser to discover the impacts humans on climate and biodiversity in the past and today.

Dr. Danielle Fraser

Danielle is a paleobiologist, and director of the Beaty Centre for Species Discovery at the Canadian Museum of Nature. Dr. Fraser studies the palaeoecology and evolution of Cenozoic-Era (66 million years to present) mammals. Dr. Fraser is a palaeoecologist and evolutionary biologist interested in how and why we have the mammals we do today and understanding how they might change under ongoing global change. Dr. Fraser is particularly interested in the evolution of hoofed mammals (relatives of modern horses, pigs, sheep and deer), studying their diversification, morphological and dietary evolution during the Cenozoic of North America.

Dr. Advait Jukar

Advait is a Gaylord Donnelley Postdoctoral Associate at the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies and Department of Anthropology. Dr. Jukar is a palaeoecologist interested in the large mammals (e.g. elephants) of the last 20 million years. Dr. Jukar’s research is particularly focused on understanding the nature and consequences of the megafaunal extinction (last 50,000 years) in South Asia, and on the ecology and biogeography of herbivorous mammals and dinosaurs in the Indian Subcontinent and North America.

Register for Nature Ideas: Climate change and mammal extinction in the age of humans: https://forms.gle/bGbsDM6DMbobrQTm7

Want to learn more about biodiversity today?

Join international and Canadian experts for the Canadian Museum of Nature research symposium, on the topic of The Biodiversity Crisis. On April 22. A full day virtual event.

Registration is free: nature.ca/biodiversity