Events /

Exploring the Ocean by the Seat of Your Pants

June 3 - 7, 2019

World Ocean Day is June 8th and we're celebrating with a week of Google Hangouts with leading ocean scientists and explorers from around the world.
No matter how near or far from the ocean you live, it plays an important role in our lives, from the air we breathe, to the food we eat, to the weather we experience. Most of life on Earth can be found in our ocean and it's likely where life first originated. Yet 95% of our ocean remains unexplored, we have better maps of the Moon and Mars than we do of the ocean floor.
This week we'll celebrate the beauty and biodiversity of our ocean while learning about the challenges it faces going forward from those who have dedicated their lives to exploring, understanding and protecting it.
Classroom camera spot sign ups begin May 28th @ 12pm eastern.

The Google Hangouts:

June 3, 2019

9:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Gaelin will take students on a journey around the globe from tagging Bluefin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean to drilling ice cores in the frozen Bering Sea, from searching for an elusive fish in the Indian Ocean to studying ocean chemistry in the Canadian Arctic, and many points in between. Telling stories about oceanographic research, adventure, and science at sea has become her passion and is more rewarding than she ever could have imagined. Driven by her academic background in marine science and conservation, she seeks to share her passion for ocean exploration, and to illuminate cutting-edge scientific research being conducted to understand the complexity of our ocean ecosystems.
Gaelin will talk about her most recent expeditions to the bottom of the Blue Hole in Belize in submarines and to pristine coral reefs of the Republic of Palau.

June 3, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Andrea was the first to complete a PhD on manta rays. She stayed on in Mozambique to spearhead the conservation efforts of these animals along this remote coastline. During this time she co-founded the Marine Megafauna Foundation, an organization dedicated to saving our ocean giants from extinction. As a conservation biologist and principal researcher at MMF, her team focuses predominately on questions related to the effective management and conservation of threatened marine animals. Andrea campaigns globally for the protection of marine giants from whale sharks to manta rays, using her scientific background to formulate plans for their management. Aside from dramatically increasing the level of knowledge on manta rays themselves, Andrea’s discovery of a new giant species of manta ray in 2009 was one of the largest new species to have been described in the last few decades.

June 3, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Kristin has worked extensively in Canada's eastern Arctic researching narwhal, belugas and killer whales for the last 15 years. She found her passion for marine life through adventure and water sports, specifically kayaking, having owned and operated a kayaking operation in the north that offered close encounters with beluga whales. She has a master’s degree in environmental science from the University of Manitoba, where she researched the movement and diving of narwhal in northern Hudson Bay and is working on a PhD exploring environmental factors affecting beluga movements. Kristin works as a marine biologist for Oceans North, a science based conservation organization.

June 3, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Stephanie has worked with biologists, conservation leaders, CEOs, farmers and fisherman in Africa, Australia, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and the United States. As a wildlife conservation professional, she’s committed to raising awareness about the disconnect between modern society and the natural world. And she’s determined to explore and share how each of us can use our specific talents and skills to bridge that gap to make our planet a healthier place for generations to come. She was the host of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom web series and was recently named Ambassador for the Planet by the Wyland Foundation. She recently co-founded the Creative Animal Foundation to encourage people to embrace nature, and animals, forming a community to celebrate and protecting them.

June 3, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Kim’s research uses corals and cave stalagmites to probe the mechanisms of past, present, and future climate change. She has sailed on multiple oceanographic cruises to the deep tropics and led caving expeditions to the rainforests of Borneo in support of her research. Kim has received numerous awards for her research, most notably a NSF CAREER Award in 2007, and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2008. She sits on the international CLIVAR Pacific Panel, serves on the Advisory Council for the AAAS Leshner Institute for Public Engagement, and is one of the Lead Authors on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report. As a mother to four, Kim is a strong advocate for women in science. She is also devoted to the clear and frequent communication of climate change to the public through speaking engagements and social media.

June 3, 2019

3:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Born in Italy, Cristina grew up in the rain forests of the African Congo and developed a passion for the outdoors. Coming from a family “of the sea” Cristina developed a love for the water at a very young age and she journeyed to the Bahamas to learn to dive. She made the Bahamas her home and diving her life. Cristina is world renowned for her work with sharks in the wild. She is said to have a natural gift with sharks. Her ability to work with several types of sharks has allowed her to study sharks up close with no stress for the animals. She has developed a Caribbean Reef Shark Awareness Distinctive Specialty and was the initiator of a campaign that resulted in the complete protection for all species of sharks in the entire Bahamas. Cristina is also a highly skilled cave diver, highlighting how we abuse the drinking water beneath our feet.

June 4, 2019

10:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Julia Barnes is the award-winning filmmaker behind Sea of Life. For as long as she can remember Julia has been passionate about the natural world, but it wasn't until she was 16 that she realized the world she loved was in jeopardy. After watching Rob Stewart's documentary Revolution and learning that the world's coral reefs, rain forests and fisheries are expected to be gone by the middle of the century she was compelled to take action to protect the world she loved from human destruction. Film was the most powerful weapon she could imagine so at the age of 16, with no film experience, she picked up a video camera and set out to make a documentary to raise awareness about the biggest threats facing the planet and inspire audiences to turn things around.

June 4, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Shane's research focuses on the acoustic complexity and social behavior of the whales. For over a decade, he has been working on research projects all over the world on various whale species in tropical, temperate and arctic areas. The Dominica Sperm Whale Project has been tracking over 20 families of sperm whales in the Caribbean Sea since 2005. Through 1000s of hours of fieldwork, he has followed calves from birth through weaning and described the social dynamics among family members, as well as between the families in the Caribbean. Learn about the whales and the techniques he uses to tag and track these amazing marine mammals, and take a peek into their underwater world.

June 4, 2019

12:30 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Cancelled
Join National Geographic Explorer and fish ecologist Brian Kastl live with endangered coho salmon in a northern California stream! Brian aims to discover the conditions that trigger their downstream migration. He and local conservation organization use microchips implanted into juvenile salmon to track their journey to the Pacific Ocean. They seek to increase coho salmon abundance and to bring the species back into our lives. We'll join in as they catch salmon and implant the microchips to track their journey to the Pacific Ocean!

June 4, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Ocean ecologist Dr. Jonatha Giddens is a fellow at the National Geographic Society Exploration Technology Lab where she is developing a research program to assess biodiversity in the deep sea. This program will provide an indicator of ecosystem health while inspiring people to care about the deep sea through the science, art, and storytelling of deep-ocean exploration. With a background in natural and social sciences and training in art and traditional storytelling, Giddens uses art, science, and technology to imagine and help create a brighter future for our ocean. She has a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

June 4, 2019

3:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Ruth is a National Geographic Explorer, marine biologist, social scientist and science communicator. She is the founder and director of Protect Africa's Sawfishes. She works to better understand where in Africa and elsewhere in the developing world highly threatened sawfishes still exist, and the threats they face in those places. She is passionate about community-led conservation and creative approaches to communicating science and conservation messages to people in the developing world. She hads documented for the first time the presence of two species of sawfish in northern Papua New Guinea.

June 5, 2019

10:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Dr. Hilary Moors-Murphy is a Research Scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO). Her expertise lies in the realm of marine mammals and underwater sounds. She has more than fifteen years’ experience in studying marine mammal sounds and currently leads the cetacean research program at BIO with a primary focus on using passive acoustic methods to increase our understanding of how whales use waters off Nova Scotia throughout the year. Her work contributes to the development of new technologies for acoustic monitoring and plays an important role in conservation and protection of whales in Canada.

June 5, 2019

10:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Paul is at the front line of exploration and one of the world’s most experienced divers, field science and polar experts, he helps scientists unlock and communicate global mysteries in the most remote and challenging regions of the planet. Paul is an experienced television presenter and radio broadcaster. With a proven track record in business engagements, Paul is a sought-after speaker, chairman, host and moderator for industry, government and NGO events. Paul is currently Expedition Leader for the National Geographic Pristine Seas Expeditions. He was the Base Commander of Rothera Research Station in Antarctica, for the British Antarctic Survey for 10 years and was awarded HM The Queen's Polar Medal. For his work with NASA and the Mars Lander project on Mt Erebus, Antarctica, he received the US Polar Medal. Paul is a mountain and polar guide leading Greenland Icecap crossing and mountaineering expeditions and polar science support logistics.

June 5, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

A newly named National Geographic Emerging Explorer, Grace spent the summer working with NASA's Frontier Development Lab creating 3D models of asteroids. She earned her BSc in mechanical and ocean engineering at MIT and is currently a Marshall Scholar and PhD candidate with Oxford University’s Ocean Research & Conservation Group. An avid sailor and diver, she’s participated in five marine expeditions on four continents. Her work experience includes helping to design, build, and text submersible and aerial robots that have deployed in the Arctic, Antarctic, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans. In 2014 she was an aquanaut on Fabien Cousteau’s Mission 31, living and working on the ocean floor for two weeks in the Aquarius underwater lab. Grace will speak to students about marine robotics and the future of ocean exploration.

June 5, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Now you see me, now you don’t! Camouflage is an important survival strategy employed by animals on all levels of the food chain. Explore the different strategies that animals use to camouflage into their environment in order to survive. Students will come to understand that animals come in all different shapes, sizes and colours, and these differences make animals successful in their environment.

June 5, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Fellows of the Explorers Club (FI’16) and Associate Members of the Boston Sea Rovers, Michel and Julie and are co-owners of N2Pix. They are expedition leaders and guest speakers in Canada and the US. Their underwater images and films have been presented in film festivals throughout the US, Canada and Europe and published in several international dive magazines. They are the co-founders of an international underwater film festival and Brand Ambassadors. Michel is a photojournalist, PADI Ambassador, PADI Master Instructor, DAN Examiner, PSI Instructor and Technical Diving Instructor. Julie is an expedition videographer, filmmaker and a member of the Ocean Artist Society, Instructor and a Trimix Technical Supervisor.

June 5, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Join the Exploration Corps on board Dr. Bob Ballard’s Exploration Vessel Nautilus. The Nautilus is 64-meter ship on a mission to explore the never-before-explored areas of the ocean and seek out new discoveries and share them LIVE via www.nautiluslive.org.

June 5, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Mae is a young ocean enthusiast and was the 2017 European Our World Underwater Scholarship Society's Rolex Scholar. With an undergraduate degree in Marine Biology and currently studying a Masters in Science communication she was able to embark on a year of world-wide travel, all to do with scuba diving and the oceans! The scholarship enhanced her passion for the seas exposing her to new ways of exploring this environment as well as learning alongside world leaders in marine biology, underwater photography and science communication. Yes, she was able to see some of the most wonderful marine life that many would dream of seeing, but she also saw the many threats facing the oceans.

June 6, 2019

10:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

As the first grandson of Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Fabien spent his early years aboard his famous grandfather’s ships, Calypso and Alcyone; and learning how to scuba dive on his fourth birthday. In June 2014, Fabien and his team of aquanauts embarked on Mission 31, the longest science expedition to take place at Aquarius, the world’s only underwater marine laboratory located in Florida. Fabien’s Mission 31 broke new ground in ocean exploration and honored the 50th anniversary of his grandfather’s original underwater living experiment (Conshelf Two) by going deeper, longer and further, while broadcasting each moment live on multiple channels exposing the world to the adventure, drama and mystique of what lies beneath (mission-31.com). Currently he is working on multiple projects and dedicates much of his time to the Fabien Cousteau Ocean Learning Center (“OLC”), his non-profit 501(c)(3) founded in 2016 to fulfill his dream of creating a vehicle to make a positive change in the world.

June 6, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Joe has one of our textbook sized satellite BGAN units and will be using it to take us tide pooling live from the intertidal zone on the coast of California!
Leeches, bot flies, wasps and tsetse flies – Joe Cutler has been bitten or stung by each one, all in search of tiny freshwater fish. Cutler is a National Geographic Explorer, ichthyologist (someone who studies fish) and conservationist in Central Africa. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cameroon, and currently works with The Nature Conservancy in Gabon. Over the past four years, Cutler has conducted seven fish sampling expeditions, collecting hundreds of fish species including dozens that are new to science. Using his fish sampling data coupled with museum records, Cutler provides guidance to Central African governments and conservation-NGOs on balancing development and freshwater conservation.

June 6, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

The Turtle Hospital opened its doors 1986 with four main goals: 1) rehab injured sea turtles and return them to their natural habitat, 2) educate the public through outreach programs and visit local schools, 3) conduct and assist with research aiding to sea turtles (in conjunction with state universities), and 4) work toward environmental legislation making the beaches and water safe and clean for sea turtles. The Turtle Hospital contains up-to-date equipment needed to perform a variety of surgeries on different species and sizes of sea turtles. More than half of this equipment has been donated by local hospitals and doctors, and some equipment has been donated by environmentally- friendly organizations and individuals. There are 7 species of sea turtles throughout the entire world. Five of the seven are found in Florida: Green, Loggerhead, Leatherback, Hawksbill, and Kemp’s Ridley.

June 6, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 1

William is a conservation scientist with Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. He lives and works in Victoria, British Columbia, but also spends a lot of time in the western Canadian Arctic for his research. He studies whales, seals, and fish in the Canadian Arctic by listening to them underwater using underwater microphones (hydrophones). He is interested in how these Arctic marine animals react to changes being brought on by climate change, including the loss of sea ice and increased shipping in the Arctic. Before his current work on Arctic marine animals, William studied habitat selection and foraging behaviour of a variety of animals, including snakes, beetles, voles, and lemmings. For more info about his research, check out his website: wdhalliday.weebly.com.

June 7, 2019

9:30 am

Camera spots available: 1

Join Sven as he shares some of his stories and photos from his ocean explorations around the world. He was born in Switzerland and traveled extensively with his father, renowned adventure-travel pioneer Lars-Eric Lindblad. For six years, Sven lived in East Africa photographing elephants and wildlife in Kenya and assisting filmmakers on a documentary on the destruction of African rain forests. His early exposure to nature and wildlife taught him the importance of maintaining natural resources and understanding the cultural background of remote regions of the world. In 1979, he launched Special Expeditions (now Lindblad Expeditions), a unique travel company aimed at offering marine-focused expeditions aboard small ships for adventurous travellers.

June 7, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Bethany is a research associate with the Wild Dolphin Project, founded and directed by Dr. Denise Herzing, where she studies two resident species of oceanic dolphins: Atlantic spotted (Stenella frontalis) and Atlantic bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus) in the Bahamas. She spent years freediving and snorkeling to photograph, film, and collect data on these animals. As a researcher, she's most interested in animal movement patterns and habitat use but WDP studies everything from communication to behaviour, genetics and social structure. During her time as a biologist and living at sea, she's come eye-to-eye with tiger sharks and sea turtles, swam into a box jellyfish, and dove on the shark-diver team for Diana Nyad. Her fieldwork has brought her to many places around the globe. She's spent hours hiking along the beach at night in the Virgin Islands to study nesting leatherback sea turtles, trekked above treeline in the Andes Mountains, freedove with sleeping sharks in the Galapagos Islands and watched elephants in Kruger National Park of South Africa.

June 7, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

An avid ocean explorer, Sarah searches for life in areas of the ocean that have never before been seen by the human eye. Her passions lie in researching the dynamics of habitats fueled by chemicals, instead of the sun, and in thinking of how these habitats relate to the possibility of life on other planets. Currently pursuing a PhD in Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Science at Oregon State University, she integrates techniques of microbiology, geochemistry, and ecology to study the intricacies of life in chemically fueled ecosystems known as methane seeps. In studying these habitats, she has embarked on multiple month-long expeditions in the Pacific and Arctic Oceans, dove under meters of sea ice in Antarctica, and explored thousands of meters below the sea surface with remotely operated vehicles. Sarah actively works with organizations such as the Ocean Exploration Trust to connect with the public and inspire young scientists.