Events /

Exploring Climate Change by the Seat of Your Pants

April 1 - May 2, 2019

The planet's average surface temperature has risen about 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.9 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century.
Greenland lost an average of 286 billion tons of ice per year between 1993 and 2016, while Antarctica lost about 127 billion tons of ice per year during the same time period.
Global sea level rose about 8 inches in the last century.
There is no question that our activities are releasing greenhouse gases and contributing to the rapid warming of our planet. If we don't take action and alter our behaviour soon, there may be nothing we can do about our changing climate. It's not all bad news, we have the technology and solutions to make and impact and implement change, if we want to. Throughout the month of April, we'll connect with climate change scientists and explorers who are studying our changing planet and looking for solutions.

The Google Hangouts:

April 4, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Meet Hilde Fålun Strøm from Svalbard, Norway and Sunniva Sorby from Squamish BC as they prepare to overwinter in Svalboard! Both have served as Polar ambassadors in the Arctic and Antarctic for 23 years. They started an Expedition, Hearts in the Ice, where they will be Citizen scientists standing up for escalating Climate change. Starting in August 2019, Sunniva and Hilde will be based at a remote trappers cabin called “Bamsebu” for nine months – 140 km from Longyearbyen, Svalbard where they will serve as citizen scientists. Life at Bamsebu will be broadcast and published via Iridium satellite through social media to scientists, school children, adventurers, and interested citizens from around the world. Hearts in the Ice will serve as a platform for global dialogue and engagement concerning the changes we are experiencing in the Polar Regions which impacts the world and what we all, individually, might be able to do about it.

April 8, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Francesca is a PhD researcher at the University of Cambridge, UK. Her research looks at climate change and resilience to climate-related disasters in developing countries. She is passionate about international development and reducing the impacts of climate inequality through her research. She's worked and volunteered as a water engineer all over the world: El Salvador with Imperial College, Mexico with Engineers Without Borders UK, India with the University of Cambridge. Most recently, she worked in Sub-Saharan Africa with Medicines Sans Frontiers (MSF), where she spent one year working in South Sudan and six months in Central Africa Republic, providing water and sanitation to displaced populations. In 2016, Francesca founded Blue Tap, a social enterprise that uses 3D printing to provide household water purifying solutions for users in developing countries and now the team is taking their design to Uganda to test and further develop the technology.

April 9, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Join an Ocean Wise Educator at the Vancouver Aquarium to explore one of the most extreme environments on the planet – the Arctic Circle. Despite frigid cold waters and long seasons, the Arctic is home to a thriving and diverse group of animals from invertebrates to mammals. The Arctic is also changing however, and in this program students will discuss how the changing climate is impacting these one of a kind creatures.

April 10, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Dan is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough, focusing on atmospheric physics and education. He researches the Arctic atmosphere and climate change. He has done fieldwork collecting data at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), near Eureka, Nunavut (80°N). Dan is an advocate for science and is also a photographer.
Perched on a ridge in the remote polar desert of Ellesmere Island sits an atmospheric research facility, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL). Surrounded by vast, rugged, and beautiful Arctic scenery, a small team of Canadian scientists use sophisticated instruments at PEARL to measure and investigate a wide range of atmospheric science topics. From this is strategic location, research is conducted to better understand climate change, ozone depletion chemistry, pollution transport, and the high Arctic atmosphere. This talk will highlight how PEARL contributes to research on global environmental issues and what it is like to carry out fieldwork at one of the northernmost research sites in the world.

April 10, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Henri is a graduate student in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology / Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Joint Program in Physical Oceanography. The goal of his research is to understand how the circulation of water in our ocean plays a role in controlling global climate. The "meridional overturning circulation" is a system of surface and deep currents encompassing all ocean basins. It transports large amounts of water, heat, salt, carbon, nutrients and other substances around the globe, and connects the surface ocean and the atmosphere with the huge reservoir of the deep sea. Henri is working to learn what this movement of heat, nutrients and carbon mean for for past, present and future climate. He is also the founder of “Climate Fortnite” a livestream of the popular video game Fortnite where he hosts climate scientists and experts combing gameplay with environmental education.

April 11, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Join Jenna, climate change education manager at Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy, for a lesson about climate change and what we can do about it. Jenna supports teachers and students in grades K-16 to understand the science, impacts, and solutions to climate change through curriculum, professional development, and climate literacy presentations. As a former 8th-grade earth science teacher, she loves to present to students and teachers around the country to show them solutions they can lead on in their schools. In her spare time, she plays with her dogs Porter and Jovie, taking them for long walks in the many parks in Minneapolis. Climate Generation empowers individuals in their communities to make long-term, lasting change, believing that communities collectively hold the power to innovate and demand climate change solutions.

April 12, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Zen was born and raised in Toronto and has been interested in science for as long as he can remember. He graduated from Western University with a B.Sc. in physics and, as part of his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in physics at the University of Toronto, he frequently traveled to a remote high-Arctic site to conduct climate observations near the North Pole. He currently works as a research scientist in the meteorological research division at Environment and Climate Change Canada where he leads research projects which are aimed at improving weather observation and forecast capabilities in Canada, with a focus on Arctic weather. Recently Zen was one of the top 32 candidates to be one of Canada's next astronauts and went through a very demanding testing and training process.

April 15, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Jennifer grew up in Brampton, a suburb of Toronto. She completed a BSc degree in Marine Biology and a BEd at the University of British Columbia. After completing these degrees she taught and supported research at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Center on Vancouver Island. She then went back to school and completed her MSc and PhD while working on how human activities affect seabirds in Arctic Canada through climate change, pollution and plastic waste. She now works for the Canadian Wildlife Service and leads a unit focusing on understanding how diseases, parasites and contaminants can affect the conservation of wildlife.

April 15, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Alizé Carrère is a National Geographic Explorer researching and documenting climate change in practice. In 2013 she received support from National Geographic to conduct research in Madagascar, where she spent several months uncovering an unlikely agricultural adaptation in response to deforestation. This set her on a journey around the world to document other examples of remarkable human resilience in the face of environmental change, bringing her to places as diverse as Bangladesh, India, Norway, and China. She is currently working on a series that weaves together these stories of human adaptation to inspire innovative thinking for our planet’s biggest challenges. Alizé received her B.A. and M.Sc. from McGill University in Montreal, Canada and is currently pursuing her PhD in Ecosystem Science & Policy at the University of Miami.

April 15, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Zack Rago is the Youth Outreach Manger for Exposure Labs' Chasing Coral Impact Campaign and is thrilled to engage youth around the globe through science, art, and passion. Zack is a passionate science communicator interested in developing the next generation of stewards for the natural world. He has been working in the ocean space for most of his career. He was working with the non-profit Teens4Oceans and underwater camera company, View Into The Blue, where he became involved with the production of Chasing Coral. He, also has experience working in the aquarium world, where he followed his love for corals. He holds a B.A. in Evolutionary Biology and Ecology from the University of Colorado.

April 16, 2019

10:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Cara Clairman is President and CEO of Plug’n Drive, a non-profit that is accelerating the deployment of electric vehicles (EVs) to maximize their environmental and economic benefits. In just over seven years, Cara has taken Plug’n Drive from an idea to a thriving non-profit, recognized as a leader in the EV space. Cara has more than 20 years of experience working in the environmental and sustainability fields, including 12 years working at Ontario Power Generation, initially as OPG’s environmental lawyer and later in the role Vice President of Sustainable Development. Cara is the 2017 recipient of the Women in Renewable Energy’s ‘Woman of the Year’ award and Plug’n Drive's Electric Vehicle Discovery Centre was selected as Canada's 2019 Clean 50 Top Project. She is currently driving the 100% electric Tesla Model 3.

April 16, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 2

Mary is a Physical Geographer at Swansea University in the UK. She works on climate change specifically on palaeoenvironmental records from ancient trees. She also studies the ways in which environmental change is impacting forest ecosystems and how trees are responding as greenhouse gas levels rise and our climate changes. She works in ancient woodlands around the world, from the high arctic to Borneo's tropical rainforests.

April 16, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

William is a conservation scientist with Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. He lives and works in Victoria, British Columbia, but also spends a lot of time in the western Canadian Arctic for his research. He studies whales, seals, and fish in the Canadian Arctic by listening to them underwater using underwater microphones (hydrophones). He is interested in how these Arctic marine animals react to changes being brought on by climate change, including the loss of sea ice and increased shipping in the Arctic. Before his current work on Arctic marine animals, William studied habitat selection and foraging behaviour of a variety of animals, including snakes, beetles, voles, and lemmings. For more info about his research, check out his website: wdhalliday.weebly.com.

April 17, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Alex and Tyler Mifflin are the Water Brothers! Through their eco-adventure televison series they have explored the world, uncovering the most important water stories of our time. Alex and Tyler are passionate about this quest and have used their educations in film and environmental studies to create an award-winning series. From California's drought to the decimation of Caribbean coral reefs. Their thirst for adventure sees them dive into the Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone, join a holy festival on the River Ganges and climb Mount Kilimanjaro. As they share their passion for water conservation, the brothers learn about the solutions that scientists, experts, government officials and communities are implementing to better protect our water systems. Join in as we meet the brothers and hear about some of their water adventures around the world!​

April 17, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Patricia advises both the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Foreign Affairs on how Canada can best advance its climate change priorities on the world stage and work closely with Canadian missions to put the Government of Canada’s environmental policies into practice. She reinforces Canada’s work with other countries on innovative climate solutions and promotes our clean technology sector to global investors. Throughout her career, she has specialized in trade and economic policy, as well as climate change and energy. While working at Natural Resources Canada from 2015 to 2017, she headed the Office of Energy Efficiency and contributed to the development of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. She also gained experience on environment and climate change files earlier in her career while working at the Privy Council Office and supporting the Cabinet Committee on Economic and Regional Development Policy from 2000 to 2003. Patricia also served abroad as Ambassador of Canada to Uruguay from 2004 to 2007 and as Ambassador to Chile from 2012 to 2015.

April 18, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Daniel is an explorer, storyteller and Fujifilm X-photographer. He's an artist that uses the wilderness as his studio, it's where he goes to create, to photograph and to write. Through his photos, videos and stories, he seeks to inspire the public to experience nature as a framework and mindset for personal transformation. He believes that Nature has the power to Nurture, Awaken, Transform, Uplift, Restore and Elevate the human spirit. Daniel is the founder of WILD.ECO, a non for profit youth program that offer character developing mentorship and raises funds to send disadvantaged students to wilderness immersion camps. Its mission is to foster resilient, empowered, adaptable, curious and empathetic students of life. His work has been featured in Outside Magazine, Canoe Kayak Magazine, Adventure Kayak Magazine, Sea Kayaker Magazine, Alaska Magazine, The Daily Post, NY Post, The Telegraph and more.

April 23, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

James is one of the world’s foremost experts on Antarctic marine biology, and currently the Endowed University Professor of Polar and Marine Biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He has led 15 research expeditions to Antarctica over the past thirty years and his research have been featured in National Geographic Magazine, Discover Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Wall Street Journal, and others. McClintock Point, a promontory of land on the north side of the entrance of Explorer’s Cove on the Scott Coast of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, was named in honor of his research. His book Lost Antarctica: Adventures in a Disappearing Land garnered considerable national and international praise. In June 2013, a video short based on his book was produced and released by the EO Wilson Biodiversity Foundation that featured narration by Harrison Ford.

April 23, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 1

It’s easy to look up how much rain fell in 2018, 2000, or even 1920. But how do we figure out how rainfall was different 1,000 or more years ago--and what does that have to do with modern climate change? Christine is a geologist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and National Geographic Young Explorer who studies the history of Earth's changing climate. In her classroom, Christine will talk about her research studying ancient lakes in exciting far-flung places like the high-altitude central Andes and the deserts of the western United States. She'll describe her search for relict shorelines and fossilized algae--imprints on the landscape left behind by ancient climates that now serve as natural records of Earth's past rainfall. Join her for a trip back in time to explore the dramatic changes in water availability around the world, and what it may mean for our future.

April 23, 2019

2:30 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Barry is a hurricane hunter, flying planes that carry scientists and specialized instruments to conduct research to learn more about hurricanes and hopefully save lives. He has been a NOAA Corps Officer since 1989 and has had the fortune to work across NOAA in a variety of capacities, including as a marine scientist, NOAA diver, ship operator, weather forecaster, and aircraft pilot/commander flying into hurricanes. Barry grew up here on Oʻahu in Kāneʻohe and is a proud Kamehameha Schools Alumni and received his B.S. in meteorology from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. His graduate studies at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University distance learning program focused on aviation management with specialties in management and operations.

April 24, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Anthony comes from Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek - Gull Bay First Nation (KZA), an Ojibwe Community on the Western Shoreline of Lake Nipigon in Northwestern Ontario. A former Councillor to KZA and graduate of the Indigenous Clean Energy 20/20 Catalyst Training 2017 program, AJ is heavily equipped with confidence and resources to bring KZA Energy projects to the next level. Hired in March of 2017, he became the communities Mashkawiziiwin Energy Projects Coordinator, the official liaison between the Community, Chief and Council, Industry partners and agencies in his first major project – The Gull Bay Diesel Offset Micro Grid Project, Canada’s FIRST fully integrated remote renewable energy storage micro grid that integrates a Solar Photovoltaic Array, Micro Grid Controller, battery energy storage system in with the existing Diesel Generator Station to offset About 25% diesel use a year! A start towards a Clean Energy Future for Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek.

April 25, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Melinda is a polar scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Her work uses a combination of satellite, airborne, field and model data to study the frozen oceans in the Arctic and Antarctic environments. She’s been involved in several polar expeditions, traveling by aircraft, ship, and snowmobile to collect measurements of sea ice to better understand its role in the Earth system. From growing up in a small town in Oklahoma to being frozen in the middle of the Arctic Ocean, she loves to inspire students to break the norms and reach for new possibilities.

April 26, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Paul Sokoloff is a botanist at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa. Paul received his B.Sc. from Carleton University in 2008, and an M.Sc. in botany from the University of Ottawa in 2010, and has been working as a senior research assistant in the botany division at the museum ever since. Following a trip to Victoria Island in Canada’s Western Arctic in 2010, Paul seeks any opportunity he can to get back to Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, and is now a veteran of nine Arctic expeditions, including a leg of the Canada C3 expedition.

April 26, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 1

Susan is a Canadian geologist, geophysicist, journalist and conservationist. She explores the world’s oceans—from Antarctica to the Arctic—in the snorkel zone, a unique land-sea-ice-air interface where charismatic animals and snorkelers co-mingle. Ten years ago, Susan suffered a scuba diving trauma that landed her in a hyperbaric chamber and ended her 30-year diving career. Undaunted, her up-close-and-personal relationship with the ocean didn’t end there. She’s snorkeled with chatty belugas Hudson Bay, migrating salmon in Haida Gwaii, and with darting penguins and charging leopard seals in Antarctica. In 2013, Susan founded the Sedna Epic Expedition, which is comprised of an international team of women ocean explorers, scientists, journalists, movie-makers, photographers, artists, educators and scuba diving professionals. Since 2014, Team Sedna has mounted three dive and snorkel expeditions in northern waters (Newfoundland & Labrador, Baffin Island, Western Greenland and Iceland), conducting snorkel relays, exploring ocean change and delivering an innovative, hands-on ocean outreach to Inuit youth and Elders, with a particular focus on empowering girls. Sedna’s sea women have brought the ocean to eye level for more than 1,000 Inuit youths, girls and Elders via mobile touch aquaria that temporarily house sea critters, by running underwater robot-building workshops and by leading snorkel safaris to explore arctic waters.

April 29, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Snow is an important part of our everyday lives even when we can’t see it. It provides us with drinking water, creates habitat for animals, and directly influences our climate. Where and when we find snow is changing rapidly in response to climate change, threatening sensitive Earth systems. Josh is a Research Scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada who studies changes in snow in the Canadian Arctic and around the world. Using planes, satellites, and even Twitter, Josh is developing new methods to measure how much water is stored in snow to better understand its importance. He has recently returned from a field campaign in the North West Territories where a satellite mission concept for snow was tested. Josh might be one of the few people you meet who loves shoveling his driveway in winter.

April 29, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Matthieu is a producer, curator, photographer and director. A visual anthropologist by training, for ten years his passion for photography and ethnology has led him across the globe to photograph cultural and human diversity. In 2018, he finished a film about the Pacific Island nation of Kiribati (population: 100,000), one of the most remote places on the planet, seemingly far-removed from the pressures of modern life. Yet it is one of the first countries that must confront the main existential dilemma of our time: imminent annihilation from sea-level rise. While Kiribati’s President Anote Tong races to find a way to protect his nation’s people and maintain their dignity, many Kiribati are already seeking safe harbour overseas.

April 30, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Take a virtual field trip to the Vancouver Aquarium to learn about nature's jungle gym, coral reefs! The health of the ocean depends on its foundation, and coral reefs are the one of the most important, and most threatened, building blocks for the ocean. In this program, students will learn about the diversity of life found in tropical waters, and how it is all connected through the delicate balance of food webs and predator-prey relationships.

April 30, 2019

2:30 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Kim’s research uses corals and cave stalagmites to probe the mechanisms of past, present, and future climate change. She has sailed on multiple oceanographic cruises to the deep tropics and led caving expeditions to the rainforests of Borneo in support of her research. Kim has received numerous awards for her research, most notably a NSF CAREER Award in 2007, and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2008. She sits on the international CLIVAR Pacific Panel, serves on the Advisory Council for the AAAS Leshner Institute for Public Engagement, and is one of the Lead Authors on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report. As a mother to four, Kim is a strong advocate for women in science. She is also devoted to the clear and frequent communication of climate change to the public through speaking engagements and social media.

May 2, 2019

9:30 am

Camera spots available: 0

Sarah has one of our textbook-sized satellite BGAN units with her in Antarctica. With one of these units, she can use it to video broadcast into classroom from pretty much anywhere on the planet!
Sarah is a marine mammal biologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is fascinated by the variety of ways these animals have adapted to life underwater. Sarah’s work has taken her to remote islands, to zoos and aquariums around North America, and, most recently, to Antarctica. She has spent more than her fair share of time covered in sand and seal poop, but she couldn’t be happier. She is currently in Antarctica studying leopard seals, a top predator in the Southern Ocean. Leopard seals play important roles in Antarctic ecosystem, but little is currently known about their basic biology. Sarah is part of a research team studying the ecology and physiology of these incredible animals and how they are responding to a rapidly warming Antarctica.