Events /

Celebrating Women in Science, Exploration, Adventure and Conservation

February 1 - 28, 2019

February 11th is the International Day of Women and Girls in Science and Exploring by the Seat of Your Pants is celebrating by once again kicking all the men out and hosting amazing women is science, exploration, adventure and exploration.
Grab a camera spot in an event for your classrooms or tune in live for any event on YouTube.

The Google Hangouts:

February 5, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Emily is a MIT engineer turned science communicator. She's a host & producer of FOX's Xploration Outer Space, correspondent on Bill Nye Saves the World, and author of STEM book series The Ada Lace Adventures. In addition to writing, Emily is a professional speaker and gives talks on the topics of space exploration, scientific literacy and equality. Emily is wildly passionate about space exploration. Through her show, she wants to prove that the space industry is more exciting today than ever before in history. She wants to inspire more females to pursue STEM careers. She believes most young students, especially women and minorities, don't realize how many amazing, creative, and often free opportunities exist for students who pursue STEM majors.

February 6, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

After graduating with a marine biology degree from the University of Bangor in the UK in 2006, Jill took an internship at the Bimini Biological Field Station in the Bahamas. She worked her way to becoming manager of the field station, where she tagged and tracked a variety of shark species, recruited and trained interns, and continues to working with a coastal shark telemetry project on the coast of Florida. She's now a PhD candidate in the Cooke Lab at Carleton University.

February 7, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Adjany is a conservationist and ichthyologist working to protect the wildlife and wild spaces of the Okavango River basin from its headwaters in Angola all the way to its delta in Botswana. She currently serves as the assistant director of the Okavango Wilderness Project, an interdisciplinary collaboration between local African researchers and experts, and their international colleagues. Together, they are surveying the area to record its extraordinary biodiversity and collect information on the health of the waters, joining with National Geographic filmmakers, photographers, and writers to document the sights, sounds and progress along the way.

February 8, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Jill is a world class cave diver and water advocate, join her as she shares diving and water stories from across the country. From the Arctic to the Pacific, Atlantic and Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway, Canada actually has four coastlines. Canada’s water geography includes over 200,000 kilometers of coastline, more than any other country in the world. 8 percent of our territory is covered by lakes – more lake area than any other country in the world. We possess 9 percent of the world’s renewable fresh water, yet only half a percent of the global population. It means that there is a lot to explore and experience both above and below the waterline. From sea lions on the west coast to WWII wrecks in the east. From the sea ice of the Northwest Passage to 200-year-old wooden wrecks in the Great Lakes. Learn more at www.UnderwaterCanada.ca.

February 8, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Dr. Abigail Fraeman is a research scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. She studies rocky bodies across our solar system using orbiting satellites and planetary rovers. Abigail is a member of the Curiosity Mars rover and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter science teams, and is also the deputy project scientist of the Opportunity Mars rover.

February 11, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

With her 2019 National Geographic Society grant, Tara, a geographer and photo journalist, is planning to capture the current media narrative representing the rhino poaching crisis as a “war on poaching” with a “war on poachers.” We always hear about the demand for rhino horn and the resulting conflict between anti-poaching units and poachers as a “battle” for rhino, however this narrative overlooks the underlying reason individuals are poaching: to secure livelihood. She will profile individuals on five game reserves within Greater Kruger, South Africa who are identified as “potential informants” to poaching syndicates. And she will create a multi-media portrait art series expanding on the reach of the initial photography series.

February 11, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

SNOLAB is a world-class science facility located deep underground in the operational Vale Creighton nickel mine, near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. The combination of great depth and cleanliness that SNOLAB affords allows extremely rare interactions and weak processes to be studied. The science programme at SNOLAB is currently focussed on sub-atomic physics, largely neutrino and dark matter. At 2km, SNOLAB is the deepest clean room facility in the world. Dr. Erica Caden completed her PhD at Drexel University working on the Double Chooz neutrino experiment. As a research scientist, Erica is involved in the neutrino projects at SNOLAB (SNO+ & HALO) as well as science education and outreach activities. For SNO+, she is the detector manager responsible for keeping the experiment running smoothly day to day.

February 11, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Dr. Ellen Stofan has more than 25 years of experience in space administration and planetary science. Before becoming director at the National Air and Space Museum, she was previously Chief Scientist at NASA, serving as the principal advisor to the Administrator on science programs and strategic planning. She held senior scientist positions at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, including work on missions exploring Venus, Earth, Mars, and Saturn. She served as chief scientist for the New Millennium Program, and principle investigator on the proposed Titan Mare Explorer.

February 12, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Lauren is a conservation ecologist, adventure enthusiast, and storyteller. An undergraduate career with ecological field experiences around the globe and exposure to the wisdom of local and indigenous communities motivated her to delve into interdisciplinary conservation in ethnoecology, which values local and traditional knowledge systems alongside empirical scientific studies for successful and inclusive conservation. She worked collaboratively with Coastal First Nations to bolster local marine conservation strategies and understand the changes to groundfish populations over the last century in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia, Canada. She is a 2015 National Geographic Young Explorer grantee and is part of the 2017 Young Explorer Leadership and Development Program.

February 13, 2019

10:30 am

Camera spots available: 0

Diva is a Trinidadian deep-sea biologist who studies what lives in our world's deep oceans, and how we, humans, are impacting it. She is currently undertaking a two-year Marie Skłodowska-Curie research fellowship at the Natural History Museum in London, UK. In 2013, she completed her PhD at the University of Southampton, UK, after which, she spent three years at the University of Hawai’i, USA, researching the largely unknown abyssal fauna of the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, an area targeted for deep-sea mining in the Pacific Ocean. Throughout her career, Diva has participated in deep-sea expeditions around the world, exploring and studying previously unknown habitats. She has done a considerable amount of science communication and public engagement, with her work featured on CNN International, National Geographic, BBC World and more. Diva is also a co-founder of the non-profit NGO, SpeSeas, dedicated to marine science, education and advocacy in Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean. You can find her on Twitter (@DivaAmon) or visit her website (https://divaamon.com/).

February 13, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Sarah is a Research Scientist with The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, whose work aims to reduce the global transfer of aquatic invasive species. Sarah’s research is focused on big cargo ships, which can move aquatic plants and animals to ports and harbours around the world in their ballast water or on the underwater surfaces of the ship hull. Sarah collects samples of ballast water and biofouling to measure how many live plants and animals are being moved by ships and to test different treatment methods. Sarah has travelled across Canada to complete her research, sailing up the North American Great Lakes, and from Africa to Europe, and to the Canadian Arctic. Her findings are used to make rules that reduce the environmental impact of international shipping activities.

February 15, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Alysa is a conservation biologist specializing in polar bears; she is based out of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada but spends every fall and part of every summer in Churchill, Manitoba, sometimes called the Polar Bear Capital of the World. Alysa has been studying Canadian polar bears for seven years, focusing largely on the western Hudson Bay subpopulation, one of the first to show impacts of climate change. She currently works for Polar Bears International, supporting research and directing conservation outreach programs, all with a mission to protect the polar bear and its sea ice home for future generations. Alysa loves speaking to people across the world about polar bears and their unique lifestyle, and is passionate about helping students feel empowered to take action on climate change.

February 19, 2019

9:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Jenny is a conservation photographer, cave diver, and National Geographic Explorer. Her work as a photographer is informed by her scientific background, and she uses her imagery to communicate science and conservation. After earning a degree in marine biology at Brown University, she worked as a biologist at the U.S. Geological Survey and got her Ph.D. in interdisciplinary ecology from the University of Florida. She specializes in underwater photography, photojournalism, and science communication. Jenny is a freelance photographer represented by National Geographic Image Collection.

February 19, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Sarah's research explores how familiar solution strategies block better ones from being adopted. Sarah received her Doctorat en Psychologie from Aix-Marseille University in France and her PhD in Neuroscience from Georgia State University in the United States. Sarah has worked with chimpanzees for seven years, as well as several other nonhuman primate species including baboons and bonobos. Recently, Sarah assessed baboons' and chimpanzees' responses to a touchscreen task, which measured their abilities to replace a familiar solution strategy with a more creative one. After receiving funding from the National Geographic Society, Sarah recently investigated cross-cultural differences in problem-solving approach between Westerners and the semi-nomadic Himba of northern Namibia.

February 19, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Amanda is a professional photographer specializing in underwater imagery. As an avid scuba diver and ocean enthusiast, her goal is to help the general public embrace the beauty below the waves, in hopes that with awareness comes concern. She has received numerous awards for her photography including several from the International Photographers Awards (IPA), Celebrate The Sea, Underwater Photography Annual Awards, and many others. Her imagery has been published in major publications and news sources worldwide including National Geographic, BBC, Discovery, Smithsonian Magazine, Times Publishing, CNN, Scuba Diving Magazine, Sport Diver Magazine, Natural History Magazine, Earthweek, and Science Daily; as well as many international dive industry advertising campaigns.

February 20, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 3

Erin is currently a postdoctoral fellow under the supervision of Prof. Yingfu Li at McMaster University. Her research uses nanoscale technology to solve real world problems. Erin uses a special kind of DNA, the molecule we think of as the containing the “genetic code” to make up our bodies to build tiny technology. She has made sensors and therapeutics for applications ranging from agriculture to human disease. Recently, she was awarded the NSERC and L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science 2018 Supplement, which recognizes research promise, mentorship, and outreach. Erin has been actively involved in science outreach and mentorship for over 10 years. She has also been involved with Girl Guides of Canada for over 25 years. In her spare time, Erin has taken and taught traditional Canadian step dancing, and traditional Celtic (Scottish and Irish) dance.

February 20, 2019

12:00 pm

Camera spots available: 6

Photographer Ami Vitale has traveled to more than 100 countries, bearing witness not only to violence and conflict, but also to surreal beauty and the enduring power of the human spirit. Throughout the years, Ami has lived in mud huts and war zones, contracted malaria, and donned a panda suit— keeping true to her belief in the importance of “living the story.” In 2009, after shooting a powerful story on the transport and release of one the world’s last white rhinos, Ami shifted her focus to today’s most compelling wildlife and environmental stories. Her photographs have been commissioned by nearly every international publication and exhibited around the world in museums and galleries. She has been named Magazine photographer of the year in the International Photographer of the Year prize, received the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting and named Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographer’s Association, among others.

February 20, 2019

3:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Dr. Sonia J. Rowley is a research scientist at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), and Applied Research Laboratory (ARL). Sonia has been diving around the globe for 35 years, starting at a young age due to her parents operating the MV Maureen diving vessel in the UK. Her research is focused on the evolutionary relationships within and between the gorgonian (sea fan) coral holobiont and its environment. In 2016, Sonia received the prestigious Sir David Attenborough Award for her field and exploratory research to depths of >150-m/500 ft. using closed circuit rebreather (CCR) technology. She seeks to understand the biological success of gorgonian corals, in particular to their dominance at mesophotic and deeper ocean depths. Join Sonia as she guides us through her research, exploring how researching by the seat of your pants can often be the most rewarding.

February 21, 2019

9:00 am

Camera spots available: 2

Tori Linder is the Director of Path of the Panther, an ambitious storytelling effort identifying the land protection and wildlife crossings needed to keep the Everglades connected to North America and save a future for the Florida Panther. She first got mud on her boots (field experience) in Africa. She worked with local governments, indigenous communities and the private sector on a social enterprise model that provided communities benefits for their conservation efforts. From tagging lions and commuting in bush planes to exploring new cultures, it was a fantastic adventure. But Florida kept calling her back. Home needed help, too. Now, Tori is working with colleagues to tell the story of the Florida panther and in turn promote conservation of the Florida Wildlife Corridor. Whether she’s in murky swamp water or standing a swarm of mosquitos (sometimes both,) Tori’s spreading the word: it’s good for us (you know, humans) to take care of our home.

February 21, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 1

Imogene Cancellare is a wildlife biologist and landscape geneticist researching rare and elusive species. She combines field and laboratory techniques to understand carnivore population genetic structure, evolutionary history, and the relationship animals have with the landscape. She has studied wildlife all over the United States, from bears to fishers to newts, and is currently researching range-wide snow leopard genetics for her PhD at the University of Delaware. Imogene uses social media to talk about cool wildlife (which is all of it!) and to help others learn about being successful in careers in wildlife conservation. Outside of her work, she enjoys finding salamanders, taco trucks and coffee shops, and petting dogs.​

February 21, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Andrea was the first to complete a PhD on manta rays. She stayed on in Mozambique to spearhead the conservation efforts of these animals along this remote coastline. During this time she co-founded the Marine Megafauna Foundation, an organization dedicated to saving our ocean giants from extinction. As a conservation biologist and principal researcher at MMF, her team focuses predominately on questions related to the effective management and conservation of threatened marine animals. Andrea campaigns globally for the protection of marine giants from whale sharks to manta rays, using her scientific background to formulate plans for their management. Aside from dramatically increasing the level of knowledge on manta rays themselves, Andrea’s discovery of a new giant species of manta ray in 2009 was one of the largest new species to have been described in the last few decades.

February 21, 2019

3:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Mae is a young ocean enthusiast and was the 2017 European Our World Underwater Scholarship Society's Rolex Scholar. With an undergraduate degree in Marine Biology and currently studying a Masters in Science communication she was able to embark on a year of world-wide travel, all to do with scuba diving and the oceans! The scholarship enhanced her passion for the seas exposing her to new ways of exploring this environment as well as learning alongside world leaders in marine biology, underwater photography and science communication. Yes, she was able to see some of the most wonderful marine life that many would dream of seeing, but she also saw the many threats facing the oceans.

February 22, 2019

11:00 am

Camera spots available: 2

Callie Broaddus is a senior designer at National Geographic Kids, where she has designed and art directed over 100 books on a wide range of topics, including science, space, baby animals, snow leopards, trash, and beyond. She is a member of the Rainforest Trust Council and sits on the board of directors of the Bull Run Mountains Conservancy. As a freelance journalist and photographer, she has covered topics spanning education in the Marshall Islands and rhino conservation in Botswana to local solar legislation and the craft beer boom. She is a dedicated conservationist, and believes that youth empowerment through environmental education is key to fighting the climate and biodiversity crises.

February 22, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Anusha is a National Geographic Explorer and Young Leader, a Lewis and Clark Field Scholar and and a recent PhD graduate from the Graham lab at Stony Brook University, New York. She is broadly interested in how animals manage their energetic needs and studied how hummingbirds budget their energy across a number of field sites in Arizona and Ecuador, especially fascinated by hummingbirds’ strategy of entering a torpid state at night to save energy. She's starting an exciting postdoctoral position at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks to study ground squirrels that hibernate for 9 months of the year and other cool mammals!

February 25, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Gemina is a National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee, whose most recent work focused on documenting the stories and images of the last living former whalers in these Azores. Gemina is a photographer, biologist, and explorer with a background in conservation biology, global health, and documentary storytelling, with experience in 29 countries across six continents. Both her research and photography explore the myriad connections between humans, animals, and their shared environments. Past projects include community health and mountain gorilla conservation in East Africa, photoethnographies of the the last living Azorean whalers, ocean microplastics collection, and research on the occupational health of wildlife disease surveillance workers, among others.

February 25, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

Miami native with Jamaican roots, Danni is deeply passionate about our oceans and science communications. She dreamed of studying the oceans since she was six years old. At age 21, she co-founded along with her mom, the Big Blue & You - a non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring and educating youth about marine conservation through the arts and media. For three years, Danni served as an on-camera personality and science filmmaker with Untamed Science and Ocean GEMS. Danni is working as the host of a brand new STEM educational TV Series which features the latest advancements in bio-inspired technology and design called Xploration Nature Knows Best and co-created and produced a new initiative called Sea Youth Rise Up, which is a collaborative effort to elevate the role of youth leadership in ocean conservation policy and advocacy on World Oceans Day.

February 26, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Join Dr. Samantha Joye and her multi-national team as they explore the biology, geology, chemistry, and microbiology of deep-sea sites in the Gulf of California! This is a very young ocean undergoing changes such as active seafloor spreading, early rifting, and large-scale hydrothermal activity; making it an important site for advancing our understanding of deep ocean hydrothermal ecosystems. Using the ROV SuBastian they'll be diving deep to check out the hydrothermal activity on the ocean floor and the unique marine life that calls these extreme habitats home. This is exciting exploration as the area is largely unmapped and much of the marine life is unknown!

February 26, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 0

2015 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jessica Cramp is a shark researcher and marine conservationist who is passionate about stopping the over-exploitation of sharks and the degradation of our oceans. She spent time volunteering for a number of marine-related projects in Central America before settling in the Pacific in 2011, furthering her interest in community-based conservation and fisheries. She lives in the Cook Islands where she managed locally-based Pacific Islands Conservation Initiative (PICI), where she co-championed a grassroots campaign that rallied overwhelming community and international support that resulted in the 772,204 square mile Cook Islands Shark Sanctuary. She also works for part-time for Oceans 5, which is focused on the creation of marine reserves and reducing illegal fishing, and is the Founder of Sharks Pacific, a non-profit dedicated to shark research, outreach, education and advocacy.

February 27, 2019

2:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Ecologist Dalal Hanna is passionate about helping to solve environmental challenges to foster a more equitable and sustainable future. Currently, she is completing her Ph.D. at McGill University in Canada. She focuses on the diverse ways rivers contribute to human well-being and she aims to use her findings to inform river conservation policy. She has also published research on how anthropogenic noise affects bird song, and on mercury contamination in African freshwater fish. Sharing scientific knowledge is another one of Hanna’s great passions. She is also part of an urban beekeeping collective in Montreal that invites community members to visit hives and learn about pollinators. Dalal is a 2013 National Geographic Young Explorer grantee and is part of the 2017 Young Explorer Leadership and Development Program.

February 27, 2019

10:00 am

Camera spots available: 0

Holly joined WildCRU in 2017 and has been working on an internship for Dr Andrew Loveridge, processing camera trap images of spotted and brown hyaena from the Trans-Kalahari Predator Programme. Her field background is in South America. First in Paraguay with small mammals where she spent seven months looking at population dynamics of mouse opossums in Atlantic forest. She then spent two years working for an NGO in the Madre de Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon, which has been recognised as the most biodiverse area on the planet. She led daily line transect surveys and deployed camera traps for rapid assessment surveys and baseline data collection of medium and large mammals in previously unstudied and remote areas. I learned to track large mammals and spent considerable time observing primates. This summer she took part in an exciting research expedition searching for giant anacondas.

February 27, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 2

Dr. Parshati Patel is an astrophysicist and a science communicator. She received her Hons. B.Sc. in Physics and Astronomy from University of Toronto, and M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Astronomy and Planetary Science & Exploration from Western University. Dr. Patel investigates disks around young, massive stars. These stars are more massive than our Sun and are very young i.e. just starting to form a star. As the disks of dust and gas around these stars are a hub for formation of planets, studying these disks help us understand about the planet formation process among variety of stars. During her graduate studies, she realized her passion for science communication and public engagement while working in various astronomy and planetary science outreach programs. She currently works as an Outreach Program Coordinator at the Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration at Western University.​

February 28, 2019

1:00 pm

Camera spots available: 6

Jessica is an avid explorer, biology-enthusiast, and engineer who is passionate about exploring the oceans. For part of the year, she work as a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) pilot on adventures to the deep sea sampling and learning from the incredible biology and geology of the sea floor. When she's not on the ocean, Jessica is working towards completing her doctorate degree in the field of biomimetics and biomechanics at the University of California, San Diego. Her research includes taking inspiration from fish to design underwater adhesion mechanisms to apply to underwater robotics. This research allows her to combine her passions for biology and engineering to create novel and exciting technologies.